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Dreams do come true

Dreams come trueI will finally be an officially published author! After a life time of practicing my craft and dreaming of having a published book someday, it is about to happen. My book, Peach Cobbler for Breakfast—surviving a life-altering event, is scheduled to be published in the fall and should be available in time for holiday shopping.

I first began the book in 1991 shortly after my first husband died but found it too painful to write at that time. Over the years I have started and stopped it many times. I have queried many agents and publishers and, in some cases received some encouraging rejection letters; but no one was willing to take a chance on me.

Finally, things began to come together last year when I struck up a conversation with the man sitting next to me at a breakfast counter. He sat there with his iPhone and Kindle in front of him constantly checking updates and reading an e- book. I learned he was a man of many talents, interests and contacts and, among other things, he designed web sites. He asked what I did and then asked if I had a web site featuring my writings. I answered I did a blog but needed a full service web site. I also talked about my future goals.

After working together for a few months in creating the web site he said he also worked with other authors and he was willing to be my agent. I guess he needed to see I was a serious and dedicated writer and not just some bobble-head.

As I write in PEACH COBBLER FOR BREAKFAST, I don’t believe in coincidences. I believe they are God’s sign posts pointing us to the right path. Here was a man with the answers to many of the obstacles to my goals and I would be a fool not to work with him. Now, one year later, my book is finished under his direction and guidance; and, with his help I finally have a publisher.

Rick Lakin is his name and he blew into my life on the derachio winds. For more details on our chance meeting see Look at what the wind blew in Published on July 31, 2012  (http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/look-at-what-the-wind-blew-in/)

Thank you, Rick Lakin, for making my dreams come true.

My book is finally finished!

Book Title

Dear Friends,

I have finally finished writing my book—Peach Cobbler for Breakfast—surviving a life altering event. It has been a twenty year labor of love. It is not a recipe book but the story of my journey through self-discovery to recovery after the death of my first husband. You might say it is my recipe for positive living. Don’t think of this book as a downer because of the subject matter, there is a lot of humor included. I couldn’t have survived without humor.

I began writing Peach Cobbler for Breakfast shortly after he died and have worked on it periodically over the years. As I have talked with others who have suffered losses (either through death or divorce) of a spouse, parent, friend, or even a job, I discovered that almost everyone experiences similar feelings, emotions, and transitions. Life will never be the same but it is how we face those changes that define us and make us stronger. I hope my observations and experiences will help make the journey easier for others facing the same uncertain future.

Peach Cobbler for Breakfast is now in the hands of a publisher and, although nothing is definite yet, my agent thinks it should be out in time for holiday shopping. To give you an idea of what the book is about here is an excerpt from:

Peaches

 

 

Peach Cobbler for Breakfast

surviving a life-altering event

By Sheila Moore Thornburg Dobbie

 

Introduction

 

“Faster than a speeding bullet!  More powerful than a locomotive….”  This quote is immediately familiar to Superman fans of all ages; but, these were the only words I could think of as I heard the diagnosis of cancer time and again in a two year period.

This disease had invaded our family faster than a bullet and had decimated it with the force of a speeding train and now I needed the strength of a superman to survive.

When I was in my 40’s I went through the worst time of my life. In a two year span I lost six family members, including my father and husband within six months of each other—my father to a brain tumor and my husband to bladder cancer. It is difficult to explain to anyone who hasn’t been through a similar experience what it feels like to lose the center of your universe.

I will spare the reader and myself the pain of reliving every detail of that time. At a time when my friends were planning high school graduations, colleges and weddings for their children, I was planning or attending funerals. I was angry at the world, afraid of the future, and confused.

Much of the time I was in a state of shock, numb to both joy and pain. I seemed to live day to day in a haze trying to cope with each crisis as it came along. Once you have been hit by a speeding train and endured the pain of impact you become numb to repetitive shocks. I do not mean to minimize the magnitude of the events but rather to put everything into perspective. Things, literally, could not get much worse. Everyone I loved had been touched in some way by the catastrophic events surrounding us.

Perhaps our bodies learn to insulate us against pain, death and sorrow so we can carry on. We learn we can make it through one day and then the next and we continue living our lives one day at a time until we eventually make it out of the dark valley. It may be like living as a zombie but it works.

An old Chinese proverb says, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” I repeated this to myself many times when the journey looked too difficult or I didn’t have the energy to continue. I reminded myself that I didn’t have to do the whole journey in one day and, if all I could do that day was take one step, then that was all that was needed.

I kept the pain to myself and put on my happy face when going out into the world. I did my crying in the shower so my husband didn’t know how worried I was. I tried to keep positive for him and others. A morbid curiosity surrounds people with a debilitating or fatal disease. It’s almost as if people are searching the faces of the patient or his loved ones for any sign things are getting worse. I wanted to be sure people saw only signs of hope in my face so I applied my smile each morning along with my makeup and faced the world with a façade of confidence.

Background

David and I met at church when I was 15 and he was 17. We dated throughout high school and college and then married after dating for seven years. We fell in love to Moon River by Andy Williams and Today by the New Christy Minstrels, held hands during My Fair Lady and Sound of Music, cheered our losing football team at Marshall University and stole a kiss whenever possible. When we finally did get married there was a large clap of thunder just when the minister pronounced us man and wife and everyone said it was the man upstairs saying, “It’s about time!”

It was during the turbulent 60’s and it seemed that our lives were in as much turmoil as the rest of the world but we finally realized our goals of graduating from college. There were the pressures of college, work, integration, bussing, demonstrations, drugs, flower power, communism, the bomb, and the ever-present and growing disruption of the Vietnam War (or as some preferred–conflict). It certainly “conflicted” our lives because if the guys didn’t keep up a certain GPA, dropped out of college, or didn’t finish within the expected four years, then there was the draft to look forward to. One professor said almost daily, “You guys better study or you will be slogging around the in the rice paddies.”  We swore he was a recruiter for the draft board.

After graduation and a brief stint with Uncle Sam, we were finally free to strike out on our own. We headed for the big city of Columbus, Ohio which seemed perfect for us. It was three hours from home, which meant it was close enough so we could get home quickly in case of an emergency, and far enough away so relatives couldn’t drop in unexpectedly. I think those were my Dad’s words.

My first visit to Columbus was something right out of The Jetsons’ cartoon when my family, David, and I attended the Ohio State Fair in 1962. At the time it was perhaps the largest state fair in the country. We drove into the city on one of the first Interstate Highways I had ever seen and whirling above the city were helicopters whizzing by. This was all very new and exciting for a kid from the hills of West Virginia. As we left late that night, fireworks were bursting over the city and I felt as if I had been to the City of Oz. I immediately fell in love with Columbus and when David and I married a few years later we decided that was the place for us.

Armed with our degrees and naïve enthusiasm we headed for the big city–he to become an architect and I a teacher. We found jobs and changed jobs, we made money and lost money, we started and closed businesses, we loved and we fought. We had the usual ups and downs and disappointments most people go through but, through it all, we said that the only thing that mattered was that we had each other. We felt we could survive and conquer almost anything as long as we were side by side.

All too quickly 23 years of married life passed and it became apparent that David would not survive the bladder cancer that had stricken him at age 45. As I watched him during those last days in the hospital I thought of the good times we had but also of the hectic life we had led. Where did it get us?  I would gladly give up everything to know he would continue by my side forever. Why hadn’t we taken more vacations or weekend trips?  Why hadn’t we found more time for just us?  Life is too short.

For the first time I had to face the world alone. I may not be superman but I will survive this hell.

WEST VIRGINIA Is Almost Heaven

WVA Stamp

West Virginia celebrates 150 years of statehood

To stand at the mountaintop in West Virginia it feels as if you could almost reach out your hand and touch the hand of God. It is truly Mother Nature at her finest. That is probably why John Denver declared West Virginia  “Almost Heaven”.

West Virginia is in all likelihood one of the most beautiful states you will ever visit with its majestic green mountaintops peeking above a shroud of fog like emerald gemstones around a lady’s silken white shoulders. Much of the state is still undeveloped leaving the mountains standing as a testament of beauty, strength, and power. The state lies entirely within the Appalachian Mountain range earning it the name “the mountain state”. In the spring the mountains are dotted with large purple blooms of the rhododendron, the state flower, and in the fall the hills turn a brilliant mix of reds and golds from the state tree the sugar maple.

The mountains, however, are both a blessing and a curse for its residents. They have provided their natural resources of timber and coal to fuel the state’s economy but have also served as a physical barrier which shields the residents and cuts them off from the rest of the world. In fact, the Appalachian Mountain Ridge is what created the divide between Virginia and the western part of the state resulting in political divisions during the nation’s Civil War. The mountains were a physical barrier making communications between the two parts of the state difficult in the days before modern conveniences relying instead on having to physically cross the mountainous range for news of happenings in the capital of Richmond.

The mountains also served as a socio economic barrier between two distinct types of people. The eastern and southern parts of Virginia were composed mostly of people born in Virginia who were descendants from merchants and the wealthy classes of England. The western part of Virginia’s population was settled by immigrants of German and Protestant Scotch-Irish heritage. Many also came from Pennsylvania and states farther north.

In the eastern and southern portions of Virginia many owned large plantations where they grew cotton and tobacco and were heavily dependent upon its slave population. However, in the rugged mountainous regions of western Virginia where most owned small farms and grew small crops for their families, slavery was unprofitable. The mountains served as a divide between the two parts of the state thus emphasizing the social, political, economic and cultural differences. These differences came to a clashing climax during the Civil War over the vote of whether or not to secede from the Union. When the vote to secede was taken in Richmond on April 17, 1861 the counties in the western part of the state almost immediately voted to secede from Virginia and not go along with the secession from the Union. The counties in northwestern Virginia sent delegates to a convention in Wheeling May 13, 1861 where forming a new state was discussed.

However, things did not go smoothly in creating the new state. If you think politics are bad today they pale in comparison to the days during the Civil War. The delegates to the Wheeling Convention were never actually elected by the public.  Many were chosen irregularly—some in mass meetings, others by county committee, and some just appointed themselves. When this haphazard group met they appointed only Unionists to hold state offices.

The actual popular vote for statehood is also questionable. The vote was 18,408 for and only 781 against. The Union army that occupied most of the area at the time stationed themselves at the polls and prevented Confederate sympathizers from voting. It was reported in one county that of the 195 votes cast only 39 were by citizens of the state and the rest were cast illegally by Union Soldiers.

In spite of everything the application for admission to the Union was made to Congress and President Abraham Lincoln signed it on December 31, 1862. The rogue western counties of Virginia were finally recognized as the 35th state of the Union on June 20, 1863 known as West Virginia. However, their troubles weren’t over yet. The Virginia General Assembly repealed their act of secession and in 1866 brought suit against West Virginia asking the court to declare the counties as part of Virginia and declaring West Virginia’s admission as a state unconstitutional. The Supreme Court decided in favor of West Virginia in 1870.

In addition, the returning Confederate soldiers threatened to overturn the new government. In order to retain control, the new government stripped the returning Confederates of their voting rights. The property of Confederates might also be confiscated and in 1866 a constitutional amendment disfranchising all who had given aid and comfort to the Confederacy was adopted.

In a war that thrust brother against brother it was most evident in the new state of West Virginia. It is estimated that approximately an equal number of Union and Confederate soldiers came from the state. Also, approximately an equal number fought on both sides at Gettysburg.

West Virginia is the only state to be created by the Civil War. Nevada was admitted to the union in October 1864 however it was first a US Territory.

West Virginia is a unique state in that people can’t decide whether it is a northern or southern state. It is situated right in the middle and in fact the Mason-Dixon Line goes right through it. It has been called the most southern of the northern states and the most northern of the southern states. The accent seems to reflect this. When I have traveled north people ask what part of the south I’m from and when I travel south I’m asked where in the north I’m from.

West Virginians are known to be warm, friendly, helpful, and sometimes clannish. I recently talked with someone who lived in West Virginia for a while and he said the first time someone spoke to him on the street he was so shocked he didn’t know how to respond.

If you are looking for a change of pace, want to reconnect with life and nature, pay a visit to God’s beautiful garden. Take a thrilling rafting trip down the New River Gorge or a leisurely ride to the top of a mountain on the Cass Scenic Railroad. Take time to listen to blue-grass mountain music which goes back to the Scotch-Irish roots or tour an abandoned coal mine. Camp along a mountain stream or go to the posh White Sulfur Springs where presidents have stayed.

Time in West Virginia is time well spent.

 

Dream High

From www.homekeynotes.com

Dream #2

Just Believe

Happiness

 

 

 

From www.homekeynotes.com