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Monthly Archives: November 2013

The Day Kennedy Died


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What were you doing when you heard of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination? I was a senior in high school making up an assignment in Office Machines class.

An announcement came over the PA system that Kennedy’s car had rushed to the hospital in Dallas after a shooting. It wasn’t long after that another announcement came on saying that President Kennedy was dead. At first there were gasps and then silence. People started crying and there was a mix of fear and sadness as the horrible fact sank in. Remembering the Cuban Missile Crisis of just one year before, we were wondering if this were some evil plot of the Communists who had come to seek revenge; or, was it the act of a mad man?

Our school’s administration called for an assembly in the auditorium where we gathered to listen to prayers and then we adjourned to the outside to silently view the lowering of the flag to half-mast and went home to an early dismissal. Words couldn’t explain how we felt that our young, vigorous president was now dead. At that time I felt the future was as dark and bleak as that cold, gray November day.

In the days that followed we stayed glued to the small, grainy, black and white TV screen as we watched history played out before our tired eyes. We suffered more shock when we watched in disbelief Lee Harvey Oswald gunned down just like in the movies. But this time we had to remind ourselves this was real, not something from a gangster film.

We learned about tradition in state and military funerals. The image of the riderless horse was a poignant scene. The black stately horse with empty boots in the stirrups was an all-too-real reminder that our president was struck down in his prime. He was interrupted in the midst of a fruitful life leaving behind a young family without a father and husband and an important agenda unfinished.

The final climax of an emotional day was the image of young John Kennedy, or John-John as the public affectionately called him, saluting his father’s casket as it passed by.

As difficult as those days were, I also felt encouraged by the fact that our Constitution works. It allowed for a peaceful and orderly transfer of power during a frightening and chaotic time. There was no need to call out the troops or the fear of living under military control. During the darkest of times people knew what to do and the government continued as usual without a glitch.

The world has changed a lot since that dark November day. Some say it was the end of innocence and I agree with that statement. We no longer had the happy and carefree days of the 1950’s. The world became a little more cynical and a lot crazier.

After that, the Viet Nam war escalated and drugs raised its evil head in our society. In college there was even the phrase, “Tune in and turn out.” The world started going at a faster and faster pace which left us exhausted and frustrated. Now, 50 years later the world continues on its frantic tempo. My own theory is that on Nov. 22, 1963 we learned that things can change in an instant; a world can be turned upside down in the blink of an eye. This uncertain fate can affect anyone, even a promising young president. Now, people are out to grab what they can as fast as they can, leading to more and more greed.

It would be nice to turn back the clocks to Nov. 21, 1963 and find a way to change history. There are even a couple of books out discussing this prospect. But, since we know that is impossible let us learn from this experience. Take time to embrace life more fully; give your family and loved ones hugs; take time to talk with a neighbor; or give a stranger a smile.

We don’t know the future and can’t change the past so let’s make the most of the moment we have. Carpe diem!

 

 

 

The Apes of Eden Review:

A meaty piece of literature for the true connoisseur

 

Liberary book

 

I must make a confession. I am a literary snob. That is the unfortunate by-product of possessing a degree in English and journalism and having approximately 40 years of writing and editing in my past.

I first discovered this about myself right after college when I tried to read the latest Jackie Collins novel for which everyone was raving. I could barely make it to the end without gagging.  After years of studying the masters of American and world literature such as: Nathanial Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, Eugene O’Neil, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, John Steinbeck, Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, Charles Dickens, Shakespeare, Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Chaucer, etc., etc., etc., I found I was spoiled.

After struggling to read several contemporary novels for the purpose of conversation, I finally gave up and have since devoted my time to mostly nonfiction and journalistic writings. (Yes, I did read all three of the Shades of Grey novels—Yuck!) However, something came to my attention recently that really grabbed my interest.

My agent asked me to review a newly released work of art called The Apes of Eden. It is an epic poem written in iambic pentameter examining the development of man, religion, and the quest for God. This sounds intimidating but don’t let this description deter you.

It is obvious the author, Jon P. Gunn, had fun writing, playing with ideas and words, and occasionally teasing the reader along the way. We see this on the title page which says: The Apes of Eden, The Journey Begins, as told by Literate Louie, the Scribe of the Tribe.

Literate Louie tells us in the very beginning:

My present goal is briefly to describe

the mighty deeds of Eden’s famous Tribe

from high antiquity to modern times

in lucid, readable Heroic Rhymes

that nearly any member of our band

with brains between his ears, can understand…

 

As they say, “this isn’t everybody’s cup of tea” and the author, via Literate Louie, knows this as he goes on to say:

…One type

of reader savors Art, the other, tripe.

There is no tepid “Middle Way” to go.

Like death, or pregnancy, it’s Yes or No—

 

However Literate Louie knows there will be a market for his work as he says:

I don’t expect my work to go to waste.

We have, among us, apes of cultured taste:

the Literate Elite. I write for those.

Let lowbrows read some Scribbler’s dreary prose.

 

As the reader continues through the history of the Apes of Eden, many classical pieces of literature and scenes from the Bible will spring to mind. We see scenes reminiscent of Greek mythology, Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost and others. Chapter titles such as Genesis, Exodus, The Fall, and David and the Cyclops give us a clue as to the influences upon the author.

Through the epic poem the author, Gunn, explores classic themes such as creationism versus evolution, pride before the fall, the validity of past historical and religious events, and the relationship between man (or in this case, Ape) and God.

we’ve always been as we exist today;

we neither dropped from Heaven nor arose

“by evolution” from our racial foes.

That open-ended past I can’t conceive,

nor do I know which theories to believe….

 

he’d met someone, he said, who’d thought it odd

that we, the Higher Apes, had not found God.

 

 

Who wants to be considered such a clod

he has to hedge when asked: Have you found God?

Let’s find the Deity!” our prophet cried,

and swung excitedly from side to side.

(Remember—these are apes)

 

The apes begin their journey out of Eden, past a gate guarded by a being with a flaming sword and continue lost and without direction through desert and mountain and many strange adventures. They go on and on in their quest for a Deity until the end of the book. Throughout this quest we are reminded of Moses guiding his people to the Promised Land and other legendary figures.

If I have a criticism of the book it is that it just ends. It ends without any conclusion or a neat summary package. They say in art you must know the rules in order to break them and I feel this is exactly what the author is doing. It is his wink at the reader as if to say, “That’s life.” I understand this is the first of a trilogy so we can look forward to more in the future.

Every work of art has new discoveries to be found each time it is revisited. I found this true of The Apes of Eden. I have now read it about four times and each time I gleaned new information or a new insight. If you are hungry for a good read rather than the junk food and fluff that is fed to us in the commercial markets then look for The Apes of Eden by Jon P. Gunn at Amazon.com. It will be as satisfying as a good steak.

This is a must read for the “Literate Elite;” it is a classic in the making. So, I urge you to be among the first to read this gem and help spread the word. This is a treasure just waiting to be discovered.

 


http://apesofeden.com/review-a-meaty-piece-of-literature-for-the-true-connoisseur/

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Apes-Eden-Journey-ebook/dp/B00FW3NBMO/