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</h3> </div><div class="art-box art-blockcontent"> <div class="art-box-body art-blockcontent-body"> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> <div class="art-layout-cell art-content"> <div class="art-box art-post breadcrumbs"> <div class="art-box-body art-post-body"> <div class="art-post-inner art-article"> <div class="art-postcontent"> <!-- article-content --> <h4>Monthly Archives: <span>November 2010</span></h4> <!-- /article-content --> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="art-box art-post post-118 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-archive category-uncategorized tag-first-thanksgiving tag-five-kernels-of-corn tag-mayflower tag-pilgrims tag-thanksgiving" id="post-118"> <div class="art-box-body art-post-body"> <div class="art-post-inner art-article"> <h2 class="art-postheader"><span class="art-postheadericon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/thanksgiving-thoughts/" rel="bookmark" title="THANKSGIVING THOUGHTS:">THANKSGIVING THOUGHTS:</a></span></h2><div class="art-postheadericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postdateicon"><span class="date">Published</span> <span class="entry-date" title="7:54 pm">November 24, 2010</span></span> | <span class="art-postauthoricon"><span class="author">By</span> <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/author/sdobbie46/" title="View all posts by Sheila Dobbie">Sheila Dobbie</a></span></span></div> <div class="art-postcontent"> <!-- article-content --> <p><strong>From five kernels of corn to gobble till you wobble</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="122" data-permalink="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/thanksgiving-thoughts/september-2010-065-3/" data-orig-file="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736" data-orig-size="3648,2736" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"4.4","credit":"","camera":"COOLPIX S550","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1285244013","copyright":"","focal_length":"9.1","iso":"143","shutter_speed":"0.016835016835017","title":""}" data-image-title="September 2010 065" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?fit=300%2C225" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?fit=1024%2C768" class="size-medium wp-image-122 alignleft" src="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?resize=262%2C144" alt="" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?zoom=2&resize=262%2C144 524w, https://i1.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/september-2010-0652.jpg?zoom=3&resize=262%2C144 786w" sizes="(max-width: 262px) 100vw, 262px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></a></strong></p> <p><strong> </strong>Today’s Thanksgiving celebration is marked by over abundance of food and over eating at a table surrounded by family and friends, much like the first Thanksgiving observed by the Pilgrims.</p> <p>The first celebration had tables groaning under the weight of abundant food but instead of turkey, mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole, green bean casserole, cranberries, and pumpkin pie, the first Thanksgiving feast featured venison, lobster, mussel, wild fowl, cabbage, onions, corn, and squash,.</p> <p>The original feast lasted for three days and was held sometime between September 21 and November 11. In addition to feasting, it also included games, races, bow and arrow competitions, dancing, and singing. It was based on English harvest festivals which traditionally occurred around the 29<sup>th</sup> of September. After the first harvest was completed, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgtiving and prayer to be shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. Chief Massasoit of the Wampanoags came with many of his tribe members bearing venison to add to the feast.</p> <p>Who were these strange people we know as Pilgrims but who called themselves “saints” or “followers of the congregational way”? They were a strong, independent group of people seeking a purer form of religion, thus the name Puritan is quite often applied to them. They had left the corrupt Catholic Church and Church of England and fled to Holland where they enjoyed the liberal atomosphere of the Dutch and were free of religious persecution. There they were able to worship as they desired but after 12 years they saw their community was melding with the Dutch and their children were growing up without the English language and ways. They felt the need to go to the new world where they had the freedom to establish the society they envisioned.</p> <p>However, the very first group of Puritans to land in this country are known as Pilgrims. It was not until more than 100 years after their arrival in this country that the name Pilgrim was applied to them. Before that they were merely called “forefathers”. In 1793 the reverend Chandler Robbins delivered the sermon for what was called “Forefathers Day”. He researched the church records and found a copy of Gov. William Bradford’s description of the departure from Leiden, Holland. Bradford described their reluctance to leave the city of Leiden and said:</p> <p><strong><em>But they knew they were pilgrims and looked not much on those things, but lifted up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest country, and quieted their spirits.</em></strong></p> <p>The Pilgrims are perhaps one of the most misunderstood groups in history. A postage stamp was issued commerating the 350<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the land of the pilgrims. It showed a group of people going to church dressed in black and white and it was said the artist must have painted this scene from a black and white reproduction of the original. The Pilgrims did not wear dull and drab clothing.</p> <p>Throughout Europe in the 1600’s men and women were wearing beautiful fabrics dyed in brilliant hues. The Pilgrims had moved from England to Leiden, Holland, a large textile city, where they had the freedom to worship as they wished. It is only natural that they would have worn fabrics manufactured and sold in their resident city. Records of their inventories showed that they loved colorful material and their best costumes were very attractive. They wore fabrics dyed red, blue, purple, green, and brown and liked silver buttons and buckles (but not on their hats), pretty wools, velvets, and cottons. Buckles did not come into fashion until later in the seventeenth century and black and white were usually worn only on Sunday and formal occasions. Women typically dressed in red, earthy green, brown, blue, violet, and gray, while men wore clothing in white, beige, black, earthy green, and brown.</p> <p>To blow another myth, they were not lifeless, funless people. They loved good times with family and friends, enjoyed singing and dancing, and gatherings at the local taverns. They participated in various games, foot racing, wrestling, and card playing. Men enjoyed many of the same activities as men today. They enjoyed sports, hunting, fishing, sailing, farming, eating a hearty meal and sipping a mug of ale, and smoking tobacco.</p> <p>A fact that is lost through history is that although coming to America was for religious freedom for the Pilgrims, it was also a business venture for their investors. They spent several years negotiating with investors for financial backing before making the voyage. They raised enough money to buy one ship, the Speedwell, and to rent another called the Mayflower. Unfortunately, the Speedwell was not seaworthy and they had to turn back and double up on the Mayflower. When the 102 landed in this country they had a debt of $120,000. It is estimated that they paid back the debt at nearly 40% interest. It was agreed that the Pilgrims would be given passage and supplies in exchange for their working for their backers for 7 years.</p> <p>The Mayflower returned to England in the spring of 1621 and despite the hardships of the winter, none of the Pilgrims returned with the ship. Of the 102 who made the successful crossing more than half died the first winter as a result of poor nutrition, diseases such as scurvy, and inadequate housing in the harsh weather. Many stayed on the Mayflower and ferried back and forth to shore to build their new settlement. Of of the 102, forty five died the first winter. Additional deaths during the first year meant that only 53 were alive in November 1621 to celebrate the first Thanksgiving.  Of the 18 adult women, 13 died the first winter while another died in May. Only four adult women were left alive for the Thanksgiving.</p> <p>As was previously mentioned, this voyage was a religious experiment for the Pilgrims but it was a business venture for others. When they celebrated their first harvest after the summer of 1621 the Pilgrims never forgot their obligation to repay the backers who had financed their voyage and left them dangerously close to starvation. The food stores had been almost depleated. At one point a daily ration of food for a Pilgrim was just five kernels of corn. With a simple faith that God would sustain them, no matter what, they pulled through. History records that not a single one of them died from starvation that winter.</p> <p>The harvest of 1623 brought a surplus of corn, so much so that the Pilgrims were able to help out the Indians. They were so joyous that they celebrated a second Day of Thanksgiving and again invited chief Massasoit to be their guest. He came bringing with him  his wife, several other chiefs and 120 braves. They feasted on 12 venison, 6 goats, 50 hogs and pigs, numerous turkeys, vegtables, grapes, nuts, plums, puddings and pies. But, lest anyone forget, all were given their first course on an empty plate—with just five kernels of corn placed on each plate.</p> <p>This custom has been continued with many spiritual descendts of the Pilgrims. The five kernels of corn represented all the pilgrims had to eat for the entire day during the difficult winter. The corn that remained was planted in the spring. The five kernels of corn was a reminder that many had nearly starved because of lack of food. Each pilgrim would stand up and pick up each kernel of corn and share five things they were thankful for on Thanksgiving. To this day many families place five kernels of corn on each plate to honor and remember the suffering and spirit of Thanksgiving of our Pilgrim ancestors. They also take turns sharing five blessings for which they are grateful.</p> <p>For us today Thanksgiving is a time of over eating, football watching, visiting with family and friends, giant balloons, parades and floats. But let us not forget the purpose of the day—a day of giving thanks. The very first Thanksgivings were also filled with overeating, games, and family and friends but they never forgot that their faith in God and belief in their venture is what brought them through difficult times. Today many of us are also saddled with debt, doubt, and depravity but let us never forget the faith and beliefs of our ancestors that we too might overcome life’s many obstacles.</p> <p>Before we stuff our selves and gobble till we wobble, let us remember what brought us to this point—our ancestors’ unwavering faith and fortitude. I doubt many of us today could survive on just five kernels of corn a day.</p> <p>In the spirit of our Pilgrim ancestors I am placing five kernels of corn on your virtual plate. What are you thankful this Thanksgiving season of 2010? I am thankful for:</p> <ol> <li>The love of family and friends</li> <li>Freedom</li> <li>Good health for myself and my family</li> <li>A warm and safe home</li> <li>The courage and sacrafices of all those before me<a href="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="123" data-permalink="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/thanksgiving-thoughts/five-kernels-of-corn-038/" data-orig-file="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736" data-orig-size="3648,2736" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"4.6","credit":"","camera":"COOLPIX S550","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1290528882","copyright":"","focal_length":"11.2","iso":"64","shutter_speed":"0.008","title":""}" data-image-title="Five kernels of corn 038" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?fit=300%2C225" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?fit=1024%2C768" class="alignright size-medium wp-image-123" src="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?resize=300%2C225" alt="" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?w=3648 3648w, https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?resize=300%2C225 300w, https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?resize=1024%2C768 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?w=2000 2000w, https://i2.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/five-kernels-of-corn-038.jpg?w=3000 3000w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></a></li> </ol> <!-- /article-content --> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> <div class="art-postfootericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postcategoryicon"><span class="categories">Posted in</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/archive/" rel="category tag">Archive</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/uncategorized/" rel="category tag">Notes from the Pond</a></span> | <span class="art-posttagicon"><span class="tags">Tagged</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/first-thanksgiving/" rel="tag">first thanksgiving</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/five-kernels-of-corn/" rel="tag">five kernels of corn</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/mayflower/" rel="tag">Mayflower</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/pilgrims/" rel="tag">Pilgrims</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/thanksgiving/" rel="tag">Thanksgiving</a></span> | <span class="art-postcommentsicon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/thanksgiving-thoughts/#comments">1 Comment</a></span></div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="art-box art-post post-104 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-archive category-uncategorized" id="post-104"> <div class="art-box-body art-post-body"> <div class="art-post-inner art-article"> <h2 class="art-postheader"><span class="art-postheadericon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/my-calenday-coloring-book/" rel="bookmark" title="MY CALENDAY COLORING BOOK">MY CALENDAY COLORING BOOK</a></span></h2><div class="art-postheadericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postdateicon"><span class="date">Published</span> <span class="entry-date" title="9:28 pm">November 19, 2010</span></span> | <span class="art-postauthoricon"><span class="author">By</span> <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/author/admin/" title="View all posts by Rick Lakin">Rick Lakin</a></span></span></div> <div class="art-postcontent"> <!-- article-content --> <p><a href="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg"><img data-attachment-id="106" data-permalink="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/my-calenday-coloring-book/octob-november-2010-200/" data-orig-file="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736" data-orig-size="3648,2736" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{"aperture":"5.6","credit":"","camera":"COOLPIX S550","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1290173220","copyright":"","focal_length":"31.5","iso":"64","shutter_speed":"0.025252525252525","title":""}" data-image-title="Octob-November 2010 200" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?fit=300%2C225" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?fit=1024%2C768" class="size-medium wp-image-106 alignright" src="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?resize=300%2C225" alt="" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?w=3648 3648w, https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?resize=300%2C225 300w, https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?resize=1024%2C768 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?w=2000 2000w, https://i0.wp.com/dobbie.icrewdigital.com/files/2010/11/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?w=3000 3000w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></a>BRONZED NOVEMBER</p> <p>To have something bronzed means to preserve it by dipping it in a mixture of tin and copper. Bronze is also a color defined as yellowish brown or reddish brown to olive. All of these definitions describe November; therefore I will color this month in my imaginary coloring book bronze.</p> <p>The last remnants of summer linger on and are temporarily frozen in time like an old pair of bronzed baby shoes. The autumnal sun glints off coppery leaves and dried summer grasses looking like scarecrow soldiers swaying in the breeze. Nature’s autumn dance, so brilliantly attended by maidens dressed in rustling jewel encrusted gowns, is over and the trees stand nearly naked with only a few bronze leaves clinging to the branches. We have now entered the time of darkness filled with dread and depression as we keep watch while all of the natural world slows down and prepares for a long restoring sleep.</p> <p>A winter chill is in the air and the world takes on a harsh brassey feel. It will be a long time before our skins will take on the bronze glow of summer but we can rejoice in the bronzed skin of the turkey coming out of the oven for the traditional Thanksgiving feast. Our attention is turned indoors with the warmth of the fire in the fireplace casting a bronze glow about the room. It is now time to bring nature inside with the harvesting of nuts, stacking firewood, and storing foods to take us through the cold months ahead.</p> <p>Yes, for one last time nature desperately tries to preserve the warm memories of times spent outdoors by wrapping itself in a bronzed glow of winter sun framed by the dimesions of my picture window.</p> <p class="jetpack-slideshow-noscript robots-nocontent">This slideshow requires JavaScript.</p><div id="gallery-104-1-slideshow" class="slideshow-window jetpack-slideshow slideshow-black" data-trans="fade" data-autostart="1" data-gallery="[{"src":"https:\/\/i0.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-200.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"106","title":"Octob-November 2010 200","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i2.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-163.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"107","title":"Octob-November 2010 163","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i2.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-182.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"108","title":"Octob-November 2010 182","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i2.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-186.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"109","title":"Octob-November 2010 186","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i0.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-174.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"110","title":"Octob-November 2010 174","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i0.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-190.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"111","title":"Octob-November 2010 190","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"},{"src":"https:\/\/i0.wp.com\/dobbie.icrewdigital.com\/files\/2010\/11\/octob-november-2010-141.jpg?fit=3648%2C2736","id":"114","title":"Octob-November 2010 141","alt":"","caption":"","itemprop":"image"}]" itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/ImageGallery"></div> <!-- /article-content --> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> <div class="art-postfootericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postcategoryicon"><span class="categories">Posted in</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/archive/" rel="category tag">Archive</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/uncategorized/" rel="category tag">Notes from the Pond</a></span> | <span class="art-postcommentsicon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/my-calenday-coloring-book/#respond">Leave a comment</a></span></div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="art-box art-post post-97 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-archive category-uncategorized" id="post-97"> <div class="art-box-body art-post-body"> <div class="art-post-inner art-article"> <h2 class="art-postheader"><span class="art-postheadericon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/life-in-pondville/" rel="bookmark" title="LIFE IN PONDVILLE:">LIFE IN PONDVILLE:</a></span></h2><div class="art-postheadericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postdateicon"><span class="date">Published</span> <span class="entry-date" title="10:35 pm">November 10, 2010</span></span> | <span class="art-postauthoricon"><span class="author">By</span> <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/author/admin/" title="View all posts by Rick Lakin">Rick Lakin</a></span></span></div> <div class="art-postcontent"> <!-- article-content --> <p>MYSTERIOUS BEE HIVE COLONY COLLAPSE IS EXPLAINED</p> <p> The fun of having a blog is that I can express myself freely. No committee to choose the topic or editor peering over my shoulder, I can say anything I want without being told what to write or how to write it. So, here it goes…</p> <p>I write about my observations of nature or something that is currently on my mind. Well, this week I have been preoccupied with the actions of the board of our homeowners association. We live in a condominium and are governed by a board elected by the homeowners. If one judges our homelife according to the beautiful picture of our pond at the heading of this column and by the accompanying photos found throughout this blog, one might think we live in utopia. Yes, our surroundings are beautiful but the atomosphere here in Pondville is far from ideallic.</p> <p>Let me introduce you to some of the characters who live in Pondville. Some are worker bees who drive to and from work daily and sit in offices. Some are self-employed and work from their home, like myself. Others are retired worker bees who have exchanged the hectic office life for a life at the pond where they keep busy with hobbies, family and friends. Others don’t have enough outside interestes to properly occupy their time so they  pass the time watching the grass grow and snowflakes accumulate. This second type of retired worker bee can create havoc within the community by complaining and micro managing. Like any active hive, most worker bees are busy bees and don’t have time for home improvements and community management. That is why most bees chose to live in a communal hive.</p> <p> Although all come from varied backgrounds we all share a pride in our neighborhood. This statement sounds like it should be a uniting force, however, it has become a devicive point because each has a different concept of what is best for the community. Ideally, all the bees in the hive should be able to come together and work for the good of the community; but this only happens when the Queen Bee and her board will listen to the worker bees and then act accordingly. When all decisions and actions are done from the top with no regard to the community as a whole we have colony collapse. Colony collapse has been much in the news the last several years. In the spring, when the bees emerge from wintering in the hive scientiest have found that the numbers have been greatly reduced. Scientists are trying to figure out what causes the phenomon of colony collapse but I have the answer.</p> <p>Our Queen Bee and her close sister bees and drones usually winter south while most of the worker bees are left to face the cruelty and dirty jokes of Jack Frost. While the decision-making bees are mostly absent during this trying time, many daily decisions which affect the safety, health and general welfare of the whole population of the hive are either ignored or made with little or no regard for the general population. Once spring arrives and the population reassembles at the pond, the worker bees who braved the winter weather are angry and the newly arrived bees are not in touch with the general mood of the hive. When it comes time to make decisions about repairs and budgeting the Queen Bee and her inner court blindly blunder their way through, ignoring the pleas of the lowly worker bees.</p> <p>Statements such as, “we can do anything we want” and “this is not a democracy” (and therefore we can do anything we want) only serve to create more dissension. If only the Queen Bee and her inner court would stop buzzing long enough to listen to the common worker bees they might find that some of the lowly bees actually have good ideas. Not all brilliant ideas come from the top.</p> <!-- /article-content --> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> <div class="art-postfootericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postcategoryicon"><span class="categories">Posted in</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/archive/" rel="category tag">Archive</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/uncategorized/" rel="category tag">Notes from the Pond</a></span> | <span class="art-postcommentsicon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/life-in-pondville/#comments">1 Comment</a></span></div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="art-box art-post post-90 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-archive category-uncategorized tag-american-way tag-elections tag-patriotism tag-politics tag-voting" id="post-90"> <div class="art-box-body art-post-body"> <div class="art-post-inner art-article"> <h2 class="art-postheader"><span class="art-postheadericon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/the-day-after/" rel="bookmark" title="THE DAY AFTER">THE DAY AFTER</a></span></h2><div class="art-postheadericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postdateicon"><span class="date">Published</span> <span class="entry-date" title="10:01 pm">November 3, 2010</span></span> | <span class="art-postauthoricon"><span class="author">By</span> <span class="author vcard"><a class="url fn n" href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/author/sdobbie46/" title="View all posts by Sheila Dobbie">Sheila Dobbie</a></span></span></div> <div class="art-postcontent"> <!-- article-content --> <p>This is the day I have been looking forward to for a long time. It is finally the day after the elections. We have endured a barrage of mudslinging, name calling, headache inducing, and nauseating commercials for months.</p> <p>It begins slowly; creeping up on us months in advance and then gradually gaining momentum, like a train rushing downhill, until it crashes through the gate at Labor Day and goes completely wild. The day comes upon us frantically racing to the finish line during the months between September and November. Finally, the first Tuesday in November arrives and we drag ourselves to our local polling place to exercise our American birth right. We step into the booth and cast our votes for our chosen candidates.</p> <p>This right did not come easily. Many have shed blood and sacrificed their lives to give us the privilege of enduring annoying commercials proclaiming the brilliance of certain candidates and the foolishness of others. As annoying as the process is, it makes me glad I am an American. I don’t take lightly the fact that I have the ability to express my likes and dislikes at the polls. I thank my father, grandfather and ancestors going all the way back to the Revolutionary War for their bravery and sacrifices so that I have the freedom to express my opinions.</p> <p>No matter how we feel about the results of the elections we know that in a few months the process will begin again. We will again have the opportunity to choose our leaders on a local and national level.</p> <p>Yes, sometimes the process can be very irritating but that is the American way. We have varied political philosophies but we are united in our belief in the political system. Thank God I’m an American (warts and all)!</p> <!-- /article-content --> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> <div class="art-postfootericons art-metadata-icons"><span class="art-postcategoryicon"><span class="categories">Posted in</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/archive/" rel="category tag">Archive</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/category/uncategorized/" rel="category tag">Notes from the Pond</a></span> | <span class="art-posttagicon"><span class="tags">Tagged</span> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/american-way/" rel="tag">American Way</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/elections/" rel="tag">elections</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/patriotism/" rel="tag">patriotism</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/politics/" rel="tag">politics</a>, <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/tag/voting/" rel="tag">voting</a></span> | <span class="art-postcommentsicon"><a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/the-day-after/#respond">Leave a comment</a></span></div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="cleared"></div> <div class="art-footer"> <div class="art-footer-body"> <a href="http://dobbie.icrewdigital.com/feed/" class='art-rss-tag-icon' title="Notes from the Pond by Sheila Dobbie RSS Feed"></a> <div class="art-footer-text"> <p><a href="#">Link1</a> | <a href="#">Link2</a> | <a href="#">Link3</a></p><p>Copyright © 2017. 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